close mobile menu

Menu

Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® KinSNP® Rapid Familial Relationship Testing DNASolves® Genetic Database
News Media Press Releases
Mission Careers
Advocacy Othram Store

Justice through genomics

Othram’s scientists are experts at recovery, enrichment, and analysis of human DNA from trace quantities of degraded or contaminated forensic evidence.

We enable human identification even when other approaches fail.

Solve your case

We decipher genetic identities so you can solve cases.

Othram is the first private laboratory built to apply the power of modern parallel sequencing to forensic evidence. Our scientists are experts at recovery, enrichment, and analysis of human DNA from trace amounts of degraded or contaminated materials. We help investigators break through previously impenetrable forensic DNA barriers and close previously unsolvable cases.

Solve your case

Purpose-Built for Forensics

Othram features essential infrastructure and process for testing forensic DNA evidence, including upfront DNA profile feasibility assessment, to avoid unnecessary evidence consumption, automatic human enrichment, and separate unidirectional workflows.

Optimized for Identification

Othram digitizes many types of genetic variation, powering proprietary KinSNP® analysis, mixture deconvolution, and genealogy. These methods, in combination with the DNASolves® database and other resources, enable human ID from forensic evidence.

Secure and Accountable

Othram uniquely offers in-house processing of evidence, from DNA extraction and enrichment, to sequencing and genealogy. Our lab supports chain of custody and is staffed by seasoned forensic DNA analysts with experience testifying in court.

Recent casework

In 1987, two individuals were killed in a collision, and their vehicle caught fire. While the driver was identified, many attempts failed to identify the passenger.

In 2022, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission agreed to pursue forensic genetic genealogy DNA testing. Evidence was sent to Othram, where scientists extracted DNA and used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to produce a profile. Othram's in-house genealogists produced leads using genetic genealogy which led to the discovery that the woman was Linda Jean McClure.

In 1971, a female victim was located in the Arizona desert. For 51 years, investigators have pursued numerous leads to determine her identity, but the case went cold.

In 2022, Mohave County Sheriff’s Office Cold Case investigators partnered with Othram to determine if advanced DNA testing and Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® could help identify the woman. Othram set up a DNASolves crowdfund to raise funds to perform the work necessary to produce investigative leads. In 2023, the victim was identified as Colleen Audrey Rice.

In 2012, skeletal remains were found in Alabama. Many leads and tips had been pursued, but the identity of Opelika Jane Doe remained a mystery.

In 2022, remains were sent to Othram where scientists successfully developed a DNA extract from the remains and built a profile. The profile was uploaded to a genealogical database to enable a search for genetic relatives. Through genetic genealogy research the biological mother of Jane Doe was determined which led to the discovery that Opelika Jane Doe was Amore Joveah Wiggins.

In 2008, remains of an unknown female were found in WA. Traditional forensic DNA testing was attempted but did not yield a useful DNA profile. The case eventually went cold.

In 2022, the Yakima County Coroner’s Office (YCCO) teamed with Othram to leverage advanced DNA testing. Othram scientists were able to produce a usable DNA extract, then used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to develop a profile. A familial reference DNA sample was provided and Othram used KinSNP® testing to help YCCO identify the woman as Daisy Mae Tallman.

In 2017, skeletal remains were sent to the Mississippi State Medical Examiner's Office, without context. Because there were no leads to the identity of the man, the case went cold.

In 2021, the Mississippi State Medical Examiner's Office sent remains to Othram’s laboratory to attempt advanced DNA testing. Othram’s scientists developed a DNA extract, then used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to build a profile. Once the genealogical research was completed, leads were returned to investigators, who identified the man as Michael Len West.

In 1988, the body of an unknown woman was found in Owenton, Kentucky. Multiple traditional identification methods failed to produce leads.

In 2022, the Kentucky State Police teamed with Othram to help establish leads. Othram's forensic scientists developed a DNA extract and used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to build a DNA profile. Othram genealogists used forensic genetic genealogy to produce leads that were returned to investigators, which resulted in the identification of the victim as Linda Bennett.

In 2019, skeletal remains from an unknown man were discovered in Gateway, Colorado. With few leads for investigators to pursue, the case eventually went cold.

In 2022, Mesa County Coroner's Office partnered with Othram to establish leads. Evidence was sent to Othram's lab, where Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® was used to build a profile for the man. Othram genealogists used forensic genetic genealogy to produce leads that were returned to investigators. These leads helped in the discovery that the man was Larry Dean Watts.

In 1978, the body of an unidentified male was found in Long Beach, CA. Despite many efforts and hard work, all investigative leads were exhausted, and the case went cold.

Badly degraded and chemically damaged evidence was sent to Othram's lab. Othram was able to develop a suitable DNA extract for testing, then used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to build a DNA profile. This profile was returned to investigators who then performed a genealogical search, which resulted in the identification of the person as Kenneth Nevada Williams.

In 1993 skeletal remains were discovered in Virginia. Despite exhaustive efforts, the woman’s identity remained a mystery, and the case eventually went cold.

In 2022, the Fairfax County Police Department partnered with Othram to generate leads. Remains were sent to Othram, and a DNA extract was developed. Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® was utilized to build a profile. Otham's in-house genealogists used genetic genealogy to produce leads, which were pursued by law enforcement to identify the woman as Sharon Kay Abbott Lane.

In 2004, a human skull was discovered fifteen miles south of Red Lodge, Montana. DNA from the remains were entered in CODIS, but no matches were found.

In 2022 Carbon County Sheriff's Office engaged Othram to develop new leads. Othram's team developed a DNA extract and then used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to build a DNA profile. This profile was returned to investigators, who used the profile in a genealogical search. This resulted in the identification of the remains as those of Rogers Lee Ellis.

In August 1983, a relative of Susan Tice discovered her body in a bedroom of her home. In December 1983, Erin Gilmour's body was also found in her home by a friend.

In 2019, an investigation began that included the use of forensic genetic genealogy, with the assistance of Othram, who used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to build a profile. The profile was delivered to the Toronto Police Service and through the use of genetic genealogy, a suspect was identified. In Nov 2022, Joseph George Sutherland was arrested for the crimes.

In 1980, human remains were discovered in the Stillaguamish River in Arlington, Washington. After numerous attempts to identify the body, none succeeded.

In 2021, SCMEO began collaborating with Othram on this case to obtain advanced DNA profiles suitable for genetic genealogy. Othram used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to develop a comprehensive DNA profile. This profile, along with further DNA testing confirmed that the unknown person, dubbed "I-5 Stilly Doe", was Othaniel Philip Ames.

In 1996, Maine State Police began investigating a sexual assault of a woman who was attacked in her apartment. The serial predator was never identified.

In 2022, the Maine State Police tried to leverage advanced DNA testing and Forensic Genetic Genealogy to identify the predator. Evidence was sent to Othram. Scientists used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to develop a profile. Othram's in-house genealogy team performed research for the case and returned leads, which detectives used to confirm Jason Follette as the suspect.

In 1974, the remains of a woman were found in Massachusetts. The victim’s hands were missing, and her head was nearly severed from her body.

In 2022, skeletal remains were sent to Othram. Despite DNA damage from formaldehyde and other chemicals, a comprehensive DNA profile was built using Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing®, which was returned to FBI investigators. After discovering a close relative, the FBI were able to confirm that Lady of the Dunes was Ruth Marie Terry.

In 1984, a woman was abducted at knifepoint and sexually assaulted while walking to work. The assailant attempted to discard her body in a creek, but she survived to seek help.

In 2021, The Columbia Police Department partnered with Othram to use Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to develop a comprehensive DNA profile for the suspect using a previously-generated DNA extract. Othram's genealogy team used the profile to produce investigative leads, leading the arrest of a suspect, currently being held in a North Carolina jail.

A track record of solves

Your solve could be next.

See more cases

or

Solve your case

Solve your case.

Forensic evidence will degrade over time. Don't lose your evidence or allow it to be consumed by inadequate testing. We work with forensic scientists, medical examiners, and law enforcement agencies to achieve results when other approaches failed. Reach out to learn how we can help you with your case.

Stay connected
with us